Botox

Botox, Dysport, and Xeomin are all used to counter wrinkles. They’re a purified form of botulinum toxin A, meaning there’s no botulism risk when used properly. They work by blocking the nerves that contract muscles, softening the appearance of wrinkles.
Benefits and Side Effects

Botox is most effective on wrinkles that haven’t quite set — “dynamic” wrinkles that appear while you’re moving your face, such as when you frown. “If you don’t move the muscle too much, you won’t form the wrinkle,” says Columbia University dermatologist Monica Halem, MD. She considers Botox preventive.

If you’re breastfeeding, pregnant, or plan to become pregnant, the FDA recommends that you talk to your doctor before starting Botox, Dysport, or Xeomin.

Side effects are possible: headaches, bruising, pain at the site of injection, and, in fewer than 1% of cases, drooping eyelids or eyebrows that return to their natural position within a few months.

Frequently Asked Questions

Botulinum toxin is used to reduce fine lines and wrinkles by paralyzing the underlying muscles. People also use Botox to treat excessive sweating, migraines, muscular disorders, and some bladder and bowel disorders. Botulism, an illness caused by botulinum toxin, can cause respiratory failure and prove deadly.

Botox blocks signals from the nerves to the muscles. The injected muscle can no longer contract, which causes the wrinkles to relax and soften. It is most often used on forehead lines, crow’s feet (lines around the eye) and frown lines. Wrinkles caused by sun damage and gravity will not respond to Botox.

Although botulinum toxin is life-threatening, small doses — such as those used in the application of Botox — are considered safe. … Still, the overall risk is minimal, and Botox is considered safe overall. You should always go to a board-certified dermatologist or plastic surgeon for Botox injections.